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#155643 - 07/11/03 03:57 PM Re: Ticket Grading - huh? [Re: MW1]
wrigleyfield
Collector is an understatement.


Registered: 12/08/02
Posts: 163

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If encapsulating a ticket stub removes the memories, the same could and is said about the encapsulating of baseball cards. The grading of baseball cards is primarily motiviated by MONEY - there is a demand for the service and money to be made. No matter how good someone may think grading baseball cards is for the hobby, they will not do it unless they think they can turn a profit. Maybe there is a demand for ticket grading and maybe there is not - I have no idea. But the concept is no more "absurd" than grading a baseball card.
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#155644 - 07/11/03 05:04 PM Re: Ticket Grading - huh? [Re: wrigleyfield]
MW1
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Registered: 07/30/02
Posts: 1358

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Quote:

If encapsulating a ticket stub removes the memories, the same could and is said about the encapsulating of baseball cards.



I'm not sure that I agree. Many vintage collectors see baseball cards as miniature pieces of art -- objects that are inherently fragile and often, in need of protection. Also, kids (& adults) have been swapping and trading baseball cards for the last half-century (at least). I don't think the same can be said for tickets and ticket stubs. From what I've seen, there is little or no current demand for the grading of tickets. I just don't see where this proposal is coming from if money (and a declining market share for PSA) isn't a PRIMARY motivation. It's a cheap gimmick, nothing else.

Quote:

The grading of baseball cards is primarily motiviated by MONEY - there is a demand for the service and money to be made.



I'm not going to disagree with you here. When PSA graded its very first card -- the T206 Honus Wagner -- there was quite a bit at stake, financially speaking. I don't think there is any question that grading companies would like to make money. The proper encapsulation of vintage sports cards does serve other purposes, however, including those of authentication and independent evaluation (grading).

Quote:

But the concept is no more "absurd" than grading a baseball card.



With baseball cards, you have a finite number of issues. With tickets, the number of manufacturers and variations in printing methods is seemingly limitless. The knowledge base required to properly grade all tickets and ticket stubs would literally DWARF the expertise necessary to grade sports cards. Here's but one example of that daunting task....any ideas? I challenge anyone to tell me what game this was:


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#155645 - 07/11/03 05:48 PM Re: Ticket Grading - huh? [Re: MW1]
wrigleyfield
Collector is an understatement.


Registered: 12/08/02
Posts: 163

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Maybe there is not the necessary knowledge base to correctly grade and authenticate tickets (who knows), and of course people have not been trading ticket stubs like they have baseball cards, but if there are people who collect ticket stubs then grading them (if there is sufficient knowledge about tickets - which might be obtainable by talking to major leage baseball and various teams) could serve the same purpose it serves for baseball cards.

Baseball cards have no inherent value, and neither do ticket stubs once the game they admit you to is over. If people are willing to pay money for ticket stubs from 20 years ago or 2 years ago like they are for baseball cards then ticket stubs will have a collectible value, if not, then they will not. If they have a collectible value, then grading them (if it can be done properly) is just as reasonable as grading sportscards.

I do not collect ticket stubs and have no interest in doing so.


Edited by wriglefield (07/11/03 05:54 PM)
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#155646 - 07/11/03 10:33 PM Re: Ticket Grading - huh? [Re: wrigleyfield]
Vintagedeputy
The Collectinator


Registered: 06/15/03
Posts: 469
Loc: Richmond, Va.

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I'd like to ring in with my two cents, first let me start by saying that I HATE PSA. Now, with that off my chest (I feel better), let me toss in an opinion. A few months ago when I saw that PSA was going to start grading the autograph on a card as well as the card, I thought they were stretching things. Trying to find a market niche is nice, but not if it reaches the level of absurdity. To think that people who can't grade a card correctly would even attempt to grade an autograph is crazy. Now, if that wasn't far reaching enough, we're talking about ticket stubs. The piece of paper left over that's meant to be tossed away. I also think grading "unopened packs" is silly, but that's another subject.
A few years ago, I spotted 2 stubs in an antique store. 2 1957 Senators stubs for a game against the Red Sox. One stub was nice and one was slightly tattered. I bought the stubs and after some searching, found a fellow who produced a photo copy of that game's box score. Ted Williams went 1-4 and the Sox beat the Senators easily. No surprise there. I poured over Williams stats and counted hits to see if that 1 hit in 1957 was significant (#2000, #2500 etc). It wasn't. I mounted the stubs and the boxscore in a clear piece of lucite which can be positioned different ways. A truly neat collectible.

To see those stubs in slabs with a red PSA label and to know that a father and son seeing Williams for the first time would never hold the stubs again and marvel at Williams' hit that day..........now that, would be a crime. Sometimes memories are created, as well as experienced.

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