Page 1 of 2 12>
Topic Options
#70954 - 03/06/03 12:52 AM deleted.
BigKidAtHeart
Will the real BKAH please stand up.


Registered: 03/05/03
Posts: 11

Offline
deleted.
Top
#70955 - 03/06/03 12:55 AM deleted. [Re: BigKidAtHeart]
BigKidAtHeart
Will the real BKAH please stand up.


Registered: 03/05/03
Posts: 11

Offline
deleted.
Top
#70956 - 03/06/03 02:21 AM Re: Lower Grade = Lower Risk? [Re: BigKidAtHeart]
aconte
Bid more or post more... tough one...


Registered: 02/22/02
Posts: 1896
Loc: On The Beach....where else!

Offline
When I read this article two things came to mind:

1) This may be true but high end stuff will get you a higher dollar return
in the long run. But these ex to ex/mt cards are nice. And I once in
a blue moon buy one that's not part of my main collection.

2) I wondered about the timing of this article. Did Joe Orlando write
this to encourage more submissions of lower grade material? I
wouldn't be surprised. A good marketing ploy. In many cases,
long term low end cards will make a poor investment.

aconte
_________________________

Top
#70957 - 03/06/03 03:34 AM Re: Lower Grade = Lower Risk? [Re: aconte]
theBobs
Hobbyist


Registered: 01/24/03
Posts: 40

Offline
...
Top
#70958 - 03/06/03 11:45 PM Re: Lower Grade = Lower Risk? [Re: BigKidAtHeart]
vic6string
The Collectinator


Registered: 04/25/02
Posts: 366
Loc: Miami, Florida

Offline
I think one thing the story doesn't mention that is very pertinent to what the author is trying to say is that with the recent craze over super high grade cards people are almost completely ignoring lower end cards and many great deals can be found. I find myself buying cards in the 7-8 range (to use the 10 point scale which is easier to grasp for most) for well below what they should be going for because people are caught up in the NM/M craze. These cards are in fantastic shape, and in fact these would have sold as NM/M a few years ago before professional grading came out. I feel that eventually people will see how little the difference is between these cards and cards in the 9 range, and wonder why they are paying 10 to 20 times more (and often much more than that) for super high grade. The same thing is happening in the comic market now. People are so into paying 25 times book value for a 9.6 comic that 8.5 comics are selling below book price and the difference might only be a couple of 1/8 inch "dings" in the spine of the book. I recently got a Ryne Sandberg rookie card and a Mattingly rookie in 8.5 each for what it would have costed to slab them (under 10 bucks for both, in other words, the cards were basically free). Other people are paying hundreds of dollars for the same cards just because someone says they look better under magnification with the proper lighting.
Top
#70959 - 03/07/03 12:11 AM Re: Lower Grade = Lower Risk? [Re: vic6string]
stanthemanfan
If I just sell the car, I can up my bid...


Registered: 10/28/02
Posts: 366

Offline
Vic

Amen brother - I agree with everything you wrote. I'm completely convinced that SGC92's (I'm assuming your 8.5 examples were SGC slabs) are the best value in the vintage graded card market. A lot of times, I purposely skip over MINT cards for the 92's from the same set. I'm hard pressed to find the value in paying a multiple for corners that are razor 96 sharp, instead of the 92 pin sharp.

I've also started buying 84 grades for 1950's Bowmans that I collect - great cards that routinely go for around $20. Subtract out the grading fee + shipping costs to and from NJ, and your talking about $10+ card that has a such a low population it would fall in the scarce range. Look at what drops a card to an SGC 84 grade. I slight, and I mean slight, bump to 2 corners.

I read Joe Orlando's memo a few months ago - I don't think the message that started this thread is hot-off-the-press (by the way, my CU email newsletters have stopped - anybody else have this same experience) - I don't buy PSA's - so I can't comment on whether their 6 - 7 range cards are good investments. But I do know that an SGC 84 shouldn't be considered a compromise buy. They're solid cards.

STMF

P.S.
5+ weeks and counting on my latest SGC submission. This is the 2nd straight time. Anyone else experiencing delays. I miss the "always on time" message that used to be on the website regarding grading tiers.

Top
#70960 - 03/07/03 02:11 AM BigKidAtHeart [Re: stanthemanfan]
theBobs
Hobbyist


Registered: 01/24/03
Posts: 40

Offline
...


Edited by theBobs (03/09/03 04:26 AM)

Top
#70961 - 03/07/03 05:52 AM ... [Re: theBobs]
theBobs
Hobbyist


Registered: 01/24/03
Posts: 40

Offline
...










Edited by theBobs (03/09/03 04:29 AM)

Top
#70962 - 03/07/03 06:53 AM Re: Lower Grade = Lower Risk? [Re: vic6string]
Fabfrank
(S)uper Collector


Registered: 06/11/02
Posts: 293

Offline
vic- You are so on the money. I basically collect PSA 9/SGC 96's from 1980 and up. Pre-1980 PSA8/SGC 88 or 92. You cannot beat the value on some of the SGC92's. I do collect some PSA 7 cards (I'm doing the Philly football sets in 7) and usually pick up the cards bewtween $5-$8. That's basically the price of grading. My belief is that the majority of PSA 7's are cards that the submitter felt would grade an 8. That's what makes 7's such a great deal.
Top
#70963 - 03/07/03 01:27 PM Opinion *DELETED* [Re: Fabfrank]
MW1
veteran


Registered: 07/30/02
Posts: 1358

Offline
Post deleted by dena
Top
Page 1 of 2 12>


Moderator:  EARLSWORLD 
Hop to:
Who's Online
0 registered and 2 anonymous users online.
Newest Members
abcdef863349, vwxyz{570399, nopqrs004715, tjf092071, jakerazzle1
1962 Registered Users

Generated in 0.018 seconds in which 0.001 seconds were spent on a total of 15 queries. Zlib compression disabled.